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How to Reheat Steak

A few easy ways to help reheat your favorite steak!

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It doesn’t happen often, but sometimes you find yourself needing to reheat some leftover steak without ruining its perfect texture and taste. To make it easy, why not learn the best ways to reheat your steak, so it is just as good as when you first cooked it?

Want to try different ways of cooking steaks make sure to try this Easy and Delicious Grilled Rib Eye Steak! Or for a super quick way to cook steaks, you can’t go wrong with an Air Fryer Steak!

steak on a black plate with sprigs of fresh rosemary on top

How to Reheat Steak

Freshly cooked, juicy, homemade steak is one of the rare pleasures in life that just can’t be beaten.

However, something that very, very rarely happens is that you end up cooking just that little bit too much steak. Whether because your steak was bigger than you expected, or because you filled up on your side dishes, you might end up with a good amount of leftover steak that you need to do something with.

Instead of being forced to eat some cold, greasy steak the next day, why not learn how to reheat it so that it is just as delicious as when you first cooked it?

The Easy Way: Reheating In The Oven

Just like with most things that you want to easily reheat, throwing your steak in the oven will pretty quickly warm it up to serving temperature.

However, one of the biggest problems with reheating a steak, or really any type of food, in the oven is that the oven is all about dry heat.

While the oven will certainly warm up your steak, it will also completely sap any and all moisture from your steak, leaving it a dry and pretty leathery piece of beef.

However, despite these failings, reheating steak in the oven is incredibly easy, and you can somewhat mitigate the moisture loss by wrapping the steak in foil really tightly.

Just make sure to keep the oven at a fairly low temperature, something in the region of 200-300 Fahrenheit, to ensure it doesn’t get too overcooked.

The Wrong Way: Reheating In The Microwave

Whenever the idea of reheating anything comes up, the first thing that many people think of is using the microwave.

Now, it’s true, the microwave will absolutely reheat your steak if you throw it in there and nuke it, but you would basically be destroying all of the hard work you put into making a delicious piece of steak.

Instead of juicy, tender, savory meat, you would end up with some hard, overcooked nothingness if you tried microwaving your steak.

If you absolutely must use the microwave, either because you don’t have the time for other methods, or because you just aren’t bothered, try to only microwave the cheaper cuts.

Not only does it waste less money if the meat gets ruined in the microwave, but cheaper cuts also tend to stand up better to microwaves because of their larger amount of connective tissue.

steak on a black plate with sprigs of fresh rosemary on top

The Best Way: Reheating In A Pan

Probably the best way to reheat your steak is the same way you probably cooked it – in a frying pan.

The only difference between reheating your steak in a pan and cooking it from raw is that you aren’t trying to develop any additional color on your steak, nor are you trying to the insides of the steak to a specific doneness.

Your steak should already be perfectly cooked, so all you need to do is to bring it up to temperature.

The best way to reheat your steak in a pan is to melt a little fat in there, which will ideally be the same fat you cooked your steak with, and then throw your meat in the pan when it is hot.

Turn the temperature all the way down to low, and then cover the steak, either with the pan lid, or some aluminum foil if your pan doesn’t come with a fitted lid.

From there, just warm up your steak until it gets hot! It shouldn’t take more than a minute or two, and by keeping the heat super low, you will end up with perfectly reheated, still tender steak!

Reheating Steak That Has Been Smothered In Sauce

One small difficulty you might find when trying to reheat steak is when the steak you are trying to reheat is covered in sauce.

Whether it is a peppercorn sauce or Steak Diane, sauce-covered steak means that you will need to change up what you’re doing to ensure you don’t ruin the sauce.

However, just like with reheating a regular, dry steak, the best way to reheat your sauce-covered steak is in the pan.

Simply throw the whole thing in the pan, sauce and all, and let it all come up to temperature gently over medium-low heat.

As the sauce heats, it will also heat your steak, so when your sauce is nice and hot, your steak should be too!

If you happen to have the sauce separate from your steak, you can even just reheat your sauce until it is just about boiling temperature, and then pour it over your cold steak.

So long as your steak isn’t insanely thick, the hot sauce should be able to reheat the steak just enough so that it doesn’t feel cold, making it the perfect way to avoid overcooking your steak.

What To Do With Your Reheated Steak

Depending on how much steak you have left over, you might want to actually use your reheated steak in a recipe!

While small amounts can be used in things like sandwiches as a lunch, larger portions can be used to create a whole new meal.

Here are some ideas of what to do with your leftover steak!

  • Steak Sandwich

A classic way to use up leftover steak; simply throw it in-between two slices of your favorite bread, preferably something with a bit of flavor, and then enjoy! A bit of mayo, and maybe some greenstuffs, can really help improve your steak sandwich as well!

  • Serve with Mashed Potatoes and Vegetables

To make something resembling more of a full meal, why not pair your reheated steak with some healthy mashed potatoes and vegetables?

  • Nachos

Finally, for the more indulgent option, why not use your steak as the protein for some delicious nachos? Tortilla chips, salsa, and a whole lot of cheese pair perfectly with some reheated steak pieces to make a delicious and luxurious plate of nachos!

Looking for more great How To Guides? Try these out:

How To Make Cajun Onions

How to Make Salty, Crispy Skinned Oven Baked Potatoes

How to Reheat Fried Chicken So It’s Crispy Again

Happy Cooking!

Love,

Karlynn

A few easy ways to help reheat your favorite steak so you can have delicious leftovers later!

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How to reheat steak

A few easy ways to help reheat your favorite steak!
5 from 1 votes
Prep Time
10 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Course
Dinner
Cuisine
American
Equipment
frying pan, oven
Author
Karlynn Johnston

Equipment

  • 1 frying pan with a tight fitting lid
  • 1 oven and aluminum foil

Instructions
 

Reheating in a pan

  • The best way to reheat your steak in a pan is to melt a little fat in there, which will ideally be the same fat you cooked your steak with, and then throw your meat in the pan when it is hot.
  • Turn the temperature all the way down to low, and then cover the steak, either with the pan lid, or some aluminum foil if your pan doesn’t come with a fitted lid.
  • From there, just warm up your steak until it gets hot! It shouldn’t take more than a minute or two, and by keeping the heat super low, you will end up with perfectly reheated, still tender steak!

Reheating in the oven

  • Reheating a steak in the oven will dry out the steak, and you can somewhat mitigate the moisture loss by wrapping the steak in foil really tightly.
  • Heat the oven to 200-300°, keeping the temp low to ensure it doesn't get too overcooked. Checking the steak every 5 minutes until it is warmed through.

Karlynn Johnston

I’m a busy mom of two, wife & cookbook author who loves creating fast, fresh meals for my little family on the Canadian prairies. Karlynn Facts: I'm allergic to broccoli. I've never met a cocktail that I didn't like. I would rather burn down my house than clean it. Most of all, I love helping YOU get dinner ready because there's nothing more important than connecting with our loved ones around the dinner table!

Learn more about me

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