Appetizers, Snacks & Side Dishes/ How-To/ Recipes

How To Cook Acorn Squash

how to cook squash

Every time I go to post a how to, I have to remind myself: someone, somewhere, truly doesn’t know how to cook this/do this/how long to roast this. So here’s how to cook squash.

It may seem redundant to a lot of people reading this blog, but we all had to learn somehow.

So every time I go over a basic recipe or kitchen task, I am going to try and post it more. I know there are a few university kids reading my blog (other than the obvious ones I work with) and projects such as Kick the KD reminded me that there are so many people learning still, so many younger adults yearning for more knowledge in the kitchen. And hey, I can’t count the times I google things myself, but that’s just old age and a lack of memory kicking in.

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One of the participants of Kick the KD, Ellen, actually has ME as their food blogger to read, how exciting is that!

So I guess I have to live up to the expectation that I know how to cook.  Eeep.

So the other night I made acorn squash.

It doesn’t get easier than this, cheaper, or a better way to sneak in a large serving of vegetables. The total cost at Superstore was about $1.45 a squash, each one serving two people.  Two! If my math serves me correctly, that makes each serving  about 73 cents. A very hearty serving, I might add.

You hear that, university kids? Seventy three cents. Split with a roomie.

You also need nothing but a little butter, salt and brown sugar if you want. Mike decided he liked his plain with butter and salt rather than brown sugar.

No one needs to guess which one my sweet tooth prefers.

Or my son. He ate two halves by himself, since my brother “doesn’t like squash”.

Ingredients Needed:

1 acorn squash per 2 people
1 tbsp butter per squash
1/2 tbsp brown sugar per squash
salt
pepper

Kick the tires and light the fires to 350 degrees.

Using a nice sharp knive, cleave those squash in half.

I totally just used the word cleave.

Awesome.

how to cook squash

Clean out the seeds and stringy bits, so that it’s beautifully clean, like this.

how to cook squash

Place cut side down on a baking sheet lined with tinfoil, then add enough water so that it slightly covers the sides of the squash. You can also cook these facing up, but I find this way you end up with amazingly soft squash that hasn’t dried out in places or burnt in others. It cooks them uniformly.

Bake at 350 for 35-40 minutes, until they are soft. Remove them baking sheet from the oven and place on top of the stove. Turn on the broiler in your oven.

Take your butter and place in the center of each.

how to cook squash

If you are going for sweet, add the brown sugar. Sprinkle with salt.

how to cook squash

Return to the oven and broil for about 5 minutes, melting the butter/sugar, browning the edges slightly and you end up with this:

a lovely, soft bowl of squash with a pool of sugary butter that you can eat with a spoon.

Almost as good as dessert and you get about 2 servings of vegetables in.

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How to Cook Acorn Squash


  • Author: Karlynn Johnston
  • Prep Time: 5 min
  • Cook Time: 40 min
  • Total Time: 45 min

Description

Every time I go to post a how to, I have to remind myself: someone, somewhere, truly doesn’t know how to cook this/do this/how long to roast this. So here’s how to cook acorn squash.


Ingredients

  • 1 acorn squash per 2 people
  • 1 tbsp butter per squash
  • 1/2 tbsp brown sugar per squash

salt

    pepper


      Instructions

      1. Kick the tires and light the fires to 350 degrees.
      2. Using a nice sharp knive, cleave those squash in half.
      3. Clean out the seeds and stringy bits, so that it’s beautifully clean.
      4. Place cut side down on a baking sheet lined with tinfoil, then add enough water so that it slightly covers the sides of the squash. You can also cook these facing up, but I find this way you end up with amazingly soft squash that hasn’t dried out in places or burnt in others. It cooks them uniformly.
      5. Bake at 350 for 35-40 minutes, until they are soft. Remove them baking sheet from the oven and place on top of the stove. Turn on the broiler in your oven.
      6. Take your butter and place in the center of each.
      7. If you are going for sweet, add the brown sugar. Sprinkle with salt.
      8. Return to the oven and broil for about 5 minutes, melting the butter/sugar, browning the edges slightly and you end up with this:
      9. a lovely, soft bowl of squash with a pool of sugary butter that you can eat with a spoon.
      10. Almost as good as dessert and you get about 2 servings of vegetables in.

      Nutrition

      • Serving Size: 2

      how to cook squash

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      40 Comments

    • Reply
      Julie Pilgrim
      November 28, 2017 at 8:46 pm

      I am a grandmother but I live with and take care of my mother. I’ve never gotten into cooking but I can if it’s way simple easy stuff. I more than appreciate your knowledge and help. Double thanks for detailing everything because I am an older learning cook that without your details I would pull my hair out.
      I Truly Thank you
      J. Pilgrim
      Mountain Home, Idaho

    • Reply
      Sheryll
      November 13, 2017 at 3:52 pm

      The only thing I would add, especially since you have young readers, is to absolutely always, every single time, WASH anything you cut before you do anything else.

    • Reply
      Dennie
      October 24, 2017 at 10:27 pm

      Thank you K- I made my acorn squash tonight using your recipe.

      I’m 52 and been doing it wrong all these years 😳 😂.

      Thank you! My squash which I have been craving for weeks – surpassed my expectations!❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️

    • Reply
      donald jezequel
      October 23, 2017 at 7:02 pm

      thanks for your very helpful instructions

    • Reply
      Tara
      August 8, 2017 at 10:44 am

      This is EXACTLY what I needed. Thank you for being so detailed, it’s appreciated.

    • Reply
      angela hammill
      March 26, 2017 at 1:57 pm

      i could eat this all day !!!

    • Reply
      KathyVentura
      March 22, 2016 at 8:51 pm

      Thank you, very good. I really like the way you write it

    • Reply
      DrCrankenstein
      January 17, 2016 at 5:29 pm

      It would probably be healthy, except for the excess butter and sugar.

      By the way, a couple of your links at the start of the article don’t work.

      • Reply
        thekitchenmagpie
        January 26, 2016 at 9:53 pm

        @DrCrankenstein That website that I linked to is sadly down (a trademark issue) and actually butter in moderation is very good for you.  

        • Butter is Rich in Fat-Soluble Vitamins 
        • Butter Contains a Lot of Healthy Saturated Fats.
        • Butter Lowers Heart Attack Risk Compared to Margarine
        • Butter is a Good Source of The Fatty Acid Butyrate
        • Butter is Rich in Conjugated Linoleic Acid.

        And a little sugar to get the vegetables down never hurt anyone! 

        • Reply
          Dennie
          October 24, 2017 at 10:29 pm

          👍

    • Reply
      BrookeLalaurie
      December 1, 2015 at 12:39 am

      Amazing! THANK YOU !

    • Reply
      RonBooth
      November 17, 2015 at 10:05 pm

      One helpful step I find missing in many acorn squash recipes is to take a slice off each side of the squash so that when its turned over round side down it wont roll around.  But at the end of the day this is one great way to get those hard to feed kids (even older kids) to eat their veggies.

    • Reply
      ShannonBarill
      October 10, 2015 at 9:27 pm

      So easy even I can do it!!  Thank you!!

    • Reply
      kolttee371
      September 30, 2015 at 11:11 pm

      I love this method using it for a carnival squash. Minus the sugar as I love squash just the way it tastes with butter salt and pepper. A Red Hubbard squash is so so sweet you wont need sugar. Very hard to cut. Try one. Thanks Blessings 

    • Reply
      GillianSullivan
      September 23, 2015 at 3:46 am

      Hey, I just wanted to say that I am one of those uni students who can kinda cook but really doesn’t know the half of it. I just got married to a great guy who can cook and loves to, but there are foods he doesn’t like and nights he isn’t around for dinner.

      I have loved squash forever. I can remember my mum making it once or twice a month (a bit of a treat) and I adored it. So, naturally, when I saw it in the grocery store after not having any for a long while, the craving kicked in. I eagerly selected the one I liked the look of best and payed for it without giving it a second thought… Only to get home and realize I actually don’t know how to cook one and Mr Man doesn’t like squash. Boo. I do know you have to roast it… somehow… but have no clue as to the actual process and steps required to successfully roast, well anything, but specifically squash. 

      The long and short of all this is Thank you!

      • Reply
        thekitchenmagpie
        October 5, 2015 at 7:56 pm

        GillianSullivan Awesome! You are so very welcome!

    • Reply
      Cate Robinson
      August 3, 2015 at 8:58 pm

      I’m 43 and I don’t really know how to cook.  I want to learn, but a lot of times it just seems so overwhelming.  So please never feel like you’re being redundant by posting basic techniques, there are those of us out there who appreciate it!  By the way, I’d never even attempted to cook acorn squash until about 6 months ago so you never know! :) 

      • Reply
        thekitchenmagpie
        August 15, 2015 at 4:12 pm

        @Cate Robinson <3 Aw thanks! I am so glad that you found my site!

    • Reply
      Sasha Purton
      March 22, 2015 at 9:59 pm

      Sadly to say I am 51 & learning from you how to cook squash. My mom cooked differently… structured so I am not aware of this lovely new food I have found. I thank you for explaining evrything so simply. Young or old we can all learn from each other….thanks  :D

    • Reply
      wc
      March 21, 2015 at 12:35 am

      Thank you for the amazing step by step and the pictures. It was amazing and will place this new found treat in my everyday life.

      Thanks again

    • Reply
      MrsWBL
      February 2, 2015 at 12:32 am

      We finish ours with a cinnamon & sugar mix. Since I follow low carb, substitueing sweetener keeps it healthy at 10 carbs per half.

    • Reply
      ANE
      November 13, 2014 at 5:48 pm

      Thanks for the info, I’m  married 58 yes and never cooked an acorn squash .Someone dropped one off so here I go .  Never too old or late to try something new. Will check on you again.

    • Reply
      Amadea
      October 12, 2014 at 6:20 pm

      Thanks for this recipe. Here’s another one …. I like to cut them sideways, instead of stem to stern. That way you get a beautiful flower-like presentation. My Dad’s Pennsylvania Dutch recipe calls for cooking them upright, having filled the middle with a sprinkling of salt and pepper, a small dab of butter, and then topping up with real cream. Bake for 45 minutes. When you serve, put it on a small plate that can fit beside the dinner plate, and you can dip forkfuls of squash in the cream mixture for added YUMMY.

      • Reply
        thekitchenmagpie
        October 13, 2014 at 12:12 am

        Amadea These look great!!

    • Reply
      MrsTaylor
      October 1, 2014 at 2:33 am

      I’m using this recipe right now! Acorn squash is in the oven with 4 minutes left and I can’t wait to try it! I’m a newly wed 24 year-old so anything easy, cheap, and simple is my kind of recipe! (which is why I chose this recipe over the other ones online) Thank you!

    • Reply
      SteveMancini
      January 21, 2014 at 1:18 pm

      Im liking the

      “Kick the tires and light the fires“ quote, hilarious!

      Recipes good too.   Cheers 

      • Reply
        thekitchenmagpie
        January 21, 2014 at 3:19 pm

        SteveMancini  🙂 glad you liked it! Welcome to the site! 

    • Reply
      MelanieJohanna
      October 8, 2013 at 10:28 pm

      You can also use maple syrup instead of brown sugar!

    • Reply
      Sofia
      September 22, 2013 at 4:13 pm

      Thank you for the helpful post. I consider myself an average baker but there are so many basic things I still need to learn!

    • Reply
      Melissa
      August 30, 2013 at 9:12 pm

      I am new to cooking, and have always walked by acorn squash at the store and been curious. I finally decided to look up how to cook them and came across your site! Thank you for posting “the easy” recipes that many others don’t bother with. Newbs thank you! I will try cooking one tonight 🙂

    • Reply
      Karlynn Johnston
      May 11, 2013 at 4:16 pm

      So good to hear! I love comments like these, they make my day Kelly!

    • Reply
      Kelly
      May 11, 2013 at 2:53 am

      I had never cooked nor eaten acorn squash before but bought them at the market b/c they were cheap! I googled and found this recipe and made it for my family exactly as you’ve described and it was outstanding!! I am so excited to make it again! Thank you for your ‘back to basics’ instructions! There ARE people out there who have never done these things! Thank you!

    • Reply
      Karlynn Johnston
      February 24, 2013 at 9:35 pm

      Glad you had success Julie!!

    • Reply
      Julie
      February 24, 2013 at 7:14 pm

      Thank you so much! My first success with acorn squash after 2 previous fails! I needed acorn squash purée today, so I followed your baking instructions exactly except for the broiling step. I scooped out the inside easily after cooking. When I knew I had enough, I scooped out the rest and ate it straight up! I didn’t think there was any chance of it being tasty without seasoning. I will be saving this and making the full recipe for friends.

    • Reply
      Eli
      January 5, 2013 at 6:37 am

      Very delicious! We made this recipe tonight. Great idea to add the water to the baking sheet. For an extra dose of delicious, add a little real maple syrup into the mix. You won’t regret it.

    • Reply
      Karlynn
      October 27, 2012 at 2:57 pm

      Maybe when you don’t cut the squash in half already one might pierce holes in it, but piercing it just lets MORE moisture out, we’re trying to keep it in, with the pan of water. This cooks up perfectly.

    • Reply
      bakeyb
      October 27, 2012 at 12:35 am

      Most people pierce the body of the squash first.

      • Reply
        sugarnflowers
        November 14, 2012 at 1:30 am

        @bakeyb, that I believe is done if the squash is whole to let steam escape. If they are ‘cleaved’ it is not necessary….and would lead to your fabulous squash bowl leaking.

    • Reply
      Lindsay @ Pinch of Yum
      November 5, 2011 at 4:25 pm

      Looks delicious! I love squash.

    • Leave a Reply

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